pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


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Awesome Deeds

Reading: Psalm 65: 5-13

Verse 5: “You answer us with awesome deeds of righteousness, O God our Savior, the hope of all the ends of the earth”.

The psalmist reminds us of God’s power and might. God’s power formed the mountains. The hope we find in our God extends “to all the ends of the earth”. In power and might God calmed the seas and will calm the turmoil of the nations. One day there will be peace on earth. On that day too God will “call forth songs of joy”. We long for the day.

As we wait, God continues to “care for the land… you enrich it abundantly”. God reveals power and enriches our lives by caring for the crops. God’s love is shown in the rich abundance of provision. In rejoicing, “the people shout for joy and sing” – they thank God for the flocks and grains that cover the hills.

Perhaps you are in the agricultural field and you can thank God for the bounty of the fields and pastures. Or maybe you are in another line of work and you have a different “field of blessing” for which to thank God. Perchance your vocation is as a parent or grandparent to the blessings of God in your life. Whatever the case, may we reflect for a moment on God’s awesome deeds in our lives and then rejoice in song or prayer for all the Lord has done.

Prayer: God, thank you for the wonderful blessings in my life – for you choosing me, for my family, for the work of my hands. Praise the God from whom all blessings truly flow! Amen.


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Herald, Apostle, Teacher

Reading: 1st Timothy 2: 4-7

Verses 3-4: “God our Savior… wants all men to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth”.

Paul knows his mission. That certainly comes through in our passage for today. Paul was selected by God to be a herald, an apostle, a teacher of the true faith. Each and every day Paul set out to do these things and in this letter to Timothy he instructs him how to do the same. And if we are followers of and believers in Jesus Christ, then the letter is instructions for us too.

There are three truths that Paul packs into three verses. First, the scope of the mission: “God our Savior… wants all men to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth”. In a perfect world all people would be believers. One day that world will come. But for now the task is to work into God’s goal, each day adding to those who are saved. To that end we are each called to share the good news of Jesus Christ with those we meet.

Paul’s second truth is that Jesus is the mediator between God and us. He who “gave his life as a ransom” paid for our sins with his blood and gave his life to free us from the chains of death. Jesus walked the earth so that we could see God’s love being truly lived out. In those years Jesus also gained a first-hand connection to our trials, our temptations, our sins. This leads us to Paul’s third truth. Because of that experience Jesus can stand between God and us to speak on our behalf, to help the perfect God know what it is like for us, imperfect as we are.

These three truths work together. Jesus could have returned at any time, but he has not. There are still more people to bring to Jesus, to teach to obey his commands. In love God waits for us to help others to know salvation through faith in Christ alone. Jesus remains on our side, speaking on behalf of those he walked with and stood in for. Today we go forth seeking to connect more souls to faith in the Savior. Today may we be a herald, an apostle, and a teacher!

Prayer: Lord, so many do not know you. I will cross paths with some today. Guide me to share Jesus with them, whether in word or deed. Use me as you will today, O God. Amen.


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Love in Word and Deed

Reading: Luke 6: 27-31

Verses 27-28: “Love your enemies, do good… bless… pray for those who mistreat you”.

The world into which Jesus speaks is a world ruled by the Roman Empire. There is peace but it is peace bought with the sword and violence. For Jesus’ audience, they would be living a controlled, limited life. The Romans controlled them, allowing a little religious freedom, but little else. Heavy taxation was the main burden. Individuals who refused to follow the rules or who rebelled or spoke out were quickly made an example of. Crucifixion was the Roman’s choice for dealing with dissenters – it was painful and gruesome and it was a visible punishment and deterrent. Jesus Himself would suffer this death. Even so, Jesus was all about love.

Today’s passage speaks into this environment. To start, Jesus says, “Love your enemies, do good… bless… pray for those who mistreat you”. The Romans would have come quickly to mind, followed by others who have aligned themselves with those in authority for personal gain. To think of such as these and to think of loving, blessing, and praying for them would have seemed quite radical. It was. Jesus’ kingdom of love is not of this world. It does not make sense to the people of the world and at times it is very hard for His followers to live out.

When we are able to love or bless or pray for those who hate us, it can make a big impact both on us and on them. It changes the dynamics of the relationship and how we see each other. Love has a great deal of power.

To put that love into action can be even more powerful. This is what Jesus is talking about in verses 29 and 30 – giving, giving, giving. Love must be both words and actions. It is easy to say we love our enemies. It is the next level to actually practice it.

Our passage today closes with a version of the golden rule: “do to others as you would have them do to you”. Easy to practice with our family or friends (most of the time), but harder to do with the one who just abused or mistreated or took advantage of you. Tomorrow we dive into this idea more. For today, may we love all with both our words and our deeds.

Prayer: Lord, may I love all the same, no matter who I cross paths with today. Whether my best friend or my wife or someone I do not get along with, help me to love all with your love today. Amen.


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Soil, Seed, or Sower?

Reading: Matthew 13: 18-23

Verse 23: Good soil is the man who hears the word and understands it.

In our passage, Jesus explains the parable of the sower.  He is providing ‘ears’ so we can ‘hear the word and understand it’.  It is not really just an agricultural lesson!  Application comes in seeing how or where we fit in the story.  So… soil, seed, or sower?

We most easily see ourselves as the soil and hopefully as the good soil.  As followers of Jesus Christ we all want to be receptive to and to understand His Word.  Most of the time we are good soil.  But not always.  Don’t tell me your mind hasn’t wandered during the message or during your quiet time!  The concerns of life and the distractions of the world make us all thorny soil sometimes.  At other times we can be rocky soil – where we receive the Word but allow something else to quickly crowd it out.  Sometimes we are hard as the path – allowing our anger or heartache to be a wall between us and God.

Next we see ourselves, at times, as the sower.  I think we all want to be seen as Christians in our day to day lives.  We want to be the light and love of Jesus out there in the world.  We want to be “the only Bible some people will ever read”.  At times our actions also require words.  We stop and share a prayer and some words of encouragement with a co-worker or friend we know is struggling or hurting.  We offer words of hope and trust with the meal w bring to our neighbor in a time of crisis.  We are prepared to tell of the good news of Jesus Christ when someone asks about the peace and joy that we have in our life.

We are seeds in this sense too – our witness is what plants the seeds of faith in others.  Living as a Christian, we should constantly be dropping off seeds in people’s lives, seeds that the Holy Spirit can bring to life.  By action, word, and deed our faith is seeds being planted in other people’s hearts and minds.

Soil, seed, or sower?  All three!  May we ever be willing servants of our Lord and Savior – hearing, sharing, and planting each day.


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Praise

Reading: Psalm 150

Psalm 150 is the last Psalm.  It concludes the fifth ‘book’ within the larger book of Psalms.  But unlike the other four books, it does not end with a conclusion.  All of the other books in Psalms, and most other books in the Bible, have a definite conclusion to them.  Most often it is the word “Amen” and it usually functions much like ‘The End’ does in a novel or movie.

Psalm 150 ends with two sentences that invite a continuation of the action instead.  Verse 6 reads, “Let everything that has breath praise the Lord.  Praise the Lord”.  The invitation to praise is not limited either.  It does not say Israel or even human beings but ‘everything’.  As the bird lifts up its song one can certainly find praise in that.  As the cat purrs in response to affection one can feel love and bring God praise.  If one is open to a broad definition of breath, one can connect to God in the gentle breeze on a hot summer day or in the stream gently bubbling along.  From the beauty and awe of nature we often bring praise to God.

So why does God, through the psalmist, close with an open-ended invitation to continue to praise the Lord?  On the large, upper level it is just one more example of the Bible as the living Word of God, always active and moving.  On the more personal level, it is God asking each of us to live a life of praise.  God desires for our verbal praise to be not only daily but frequent within our days.  It is our grateful response to His many blessings.  But it is also more than words.  God desires for our actions to bring Him praise as well.  How we love and care for and treat others, both our friends and family as well as the enemy or stranger, should bring praise to God.  May He so shine in our lives that all we do and say brings praise to the Lord!


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Words and Witness

The alpha and omega, the beginning and the end.  Our God is eternal.  Before the first particles started to come together to form the earth, God was long present.  We believe that Christ died to give us everlasting life.  This connects each of us to the eternal nature of God.

Today’s psalm reminds us of our connection both to God and to all of our fellow believers.  Although our physical time here on earth is limited, we are connected to a God that is limitless.  We are also connected to all who have come before who called on the name of Jesus.   It is the ‘great cloud of witness’ or the ‘communion of saints’ that form the first segment of believers.  The psalm also reminds us there are also future generations of believers yet to come.  One day each of us will be a part of heaven and unknown generations will follow in our footsteps.

There are both older people in our churches and many examples in the Bible of people who give us a witness to what it means to live a life of faith.  These people teach us both by word and deed.  Their faithful witness in times past and in our current time helps us in our journeys of faith.

We are also a part of this educational process.  We too are examples of faith to those just beginning their relationship with Christ.  Our witness to them is important.  Just as the nurturing, teaching, and love poured into us helped us to grow in the faith, we too are called to do the same.  Our witness also calls us outside our immediate circles of faith and into the world.  Our words and deeds also call out to the unbeliever, inviting them into our communities of faith and into relationship with Jesus Christ.  Shine your light for all to see.

Scripture reference: Psalm 22: 25-31