pastorjohnb

Thoughts and musings on faith and our mighty God!


Leave a comment

Already There

Reading: Genesis 24: 42-49

Verses 47-48: “Then I put the ring in her nose and the bracelets on her arms, and I bowed down and worshiped the Lord”.

As our story continues today, we can see how God is orchestrating the servant’s mission to find a bride for Isaac. All unfolds just as he prayed that it would. The prayers and events that follow seem to be fully God ordained. In fact, it is so obvious that Rebekah’s family is willing to let her go with a total stranger to marry a man they have never met. It is all pretty extraordinary.

Now, imagine the events from Rebekah’s perspective. She goes to the well that she goes to every day. Only today there is a total stranger there. Being hospitable she not only gives him a drink but also offers to water his camels. After being asked who you are, this stranger adorns you with jewelry and starts worshiping God. If I were Rebekah, I would be screaming, “Time out”! Yes, this is all wonderful and amazing, but… I imagine she felt like Mary felt when the angel first visited to tell her about the virgin birth.

How do you react when God breaks into your daily routine? What goes it feel like when it seems like God wants to turn your whole world upside down or your whole life inside out? Sometimes it is relatively small – maybe a chance encounter with a stranger who becomes a good friend. Sometimes it is more jarring and challenging – like Rebekah’s encounter. These are the moments when God calls you to leave your lifelong career to enter full time ministry or when God calls you some other task that pushes you way outside your comfort zone. But so often, as it was with the words of the servant, God will speak through a person in our lives, offering assurance that God is in control. As we choose to step into that new space that God is creating, we will find that God is already there, waiting for us to take that first step, ready to continue journeying with us. When the opportunity arises, may we step forth in faith.

Prayer: Living God, where will you show up unexpectedly today? Where will I meet you or in whom will I see your face? Prepare me to walk in faith this day, O Lord. Amen.


Leave a comment

Already There

Reading: Genesis 24: 42-49

Verses 47-48: “Then I put the ring in her nose and the bracelets on her arms, and I bowed down and worshiped the Lord”.

As our story continues today, we can see how God is orchestrating the servant’s mission to find a bride for Isaac. All unfolds just as he prayed that it would. The prayers and events that follow seem to be fully God ordained. In fact, it is so obvious that Rebekah’s family is willing to let her go with a total stranger to marry a man they have never met. It is all pretty extraordinary.

Now, imagine the events from Rebekah’s perspective. She goes to the well that she goes to every day. Only today there is a total stranger there. Being hospitable she not only gives him a drink but also offers to water his camels. After being asked who you are, this stranger adorns you with jewelry and starts worshiping God. If I were Rebekah, I would be screaming, “Time out”! Yes, this is all wonderful and amazing, but… I imagine she felt like Mary felt when the angel first visited to tell her about the virgin birth.

How do you react when God breaks into your daily routine? What goes it feel like when it seems like God wants to turn your whole world upside down or your whole life inside out? Sometimes it is relatively small – maybe a chance encounter with a stranger who becomes a good friend. Sometimes it is more jarring and challenging – like Rebekah’s encounter. These are the moments when God calls you to leave your lifelong career to enter full time ministry or when God calls you some other task that pushes you way outside your comfort zone. But so often, as it was with the words of the servant, God will speak through a person in our lives, offering assurance that God is in control. As we choose to step into that new space that God is creating, we will find that God is already there, waiting for us to take that first step, ready to continue journeying with us. When the opportunity arises, may we step forth in faith.

Prayer: Living God, where will you show up unexpectedly today? Where will I meet you or in whom will I see your face? Prepare me to walk in faith this day, O Lord. Amen.


Leave a comment

For All

Reading: Romans 8: 6-8

Verse 8: “God demonstrates his own love for us in this: while we were still sinners, Christ died for us”.

As the second half of our Romans reading opens, we are reminded again of how God is in control. We read, “at just the right time”. Not a moment too soon, not a few days too late. Perhaps it was when humanity needed saving the most. Maybe it was when things lined up just right from God’s perspective. Possibly it was a tipping point that none of us can see from this side of the veil. But at just the right time, “Christ died for the ungodly”. That is me and that is you and that it all people everywhere. Christ died for all.

The act of sacrificial death born out on the cross begs the question: Why? Paul answers the question in verse eight: “God demonstrates his own love for us in this: while we were still sinners, Christ died for us”. Why? Because God loved you and me and all of humanity so much that he was willing to send his son to die a painful death. Why? Because the price had to be paid for the sins of the world – mine, yours, all of ours. Why? Because resurrection can happen only after death. It is quite the demonstration of love.

If Christ was willing to die for us while we were still sinners, what should our response be to those we encounter that need healing or redemption or restoration or new life? Should we be willing to go as far as Jesus went to minister to those he met? If not death, then how far should we be willing to go to end injustice in all forms, to break bonds and addictions, to cross unspoken barriers, to offer forgiveness and grace? Should we even have a line?

When Jesus encountered someone in need, he did not have them fill out a questionnaire to determine if they qualified or fit certain parameters. He did not evaluate them to see if they were worth his time and energies. No, Jesus came for all and he loved all. We see this reflected in his death – he died for all. And before his final departure, Jesus instructed his followers to go and do likewise. Today, may we seek to model that same love – no conditions, no qualifications, no strings attached. May we simply love and serve all we meet today.

Prayer: Loving God, open my heart to your love, that in receiving I may give. Bind my will to your will and my ways to your ways. Empower me to love and serve others well today. Amen.


Leave a comment

Vows to All Peoples

Reading: Psalm 116: 12-19

Verse 14: “I will fulfill my vows to the Lord in the presence of all his people”.

Today’s reading begins with a question: “How can I repay the Lord for his goodness to me”? It is a good question to consider. The psalmist’s answer is the fulfillment of his vows to the Lord. Like the psalmist, we too are in relationship with God. And like all relationships, this relationship with God involves a commitment and some expectations. In verse thirteen the psalmist begins his answer to this question. He begins by lifting the cup of salvation – a way to acknowledge and be thankful for the eternal nature of his relationship with God. He continues by committing to call upon the Lord. Today we would spell out this commitment as t-i-m-e. The psalmist is committing to conversation with God. The giving of time often defines the level of commitment that we have to a relationship.

Verses fourteen and seventeen are the same. Both read, “I will fulfill my vows to the Lord in the presence of all his people”. For the psalmist that involved thank offerings and praising God in the temple. Our vows certainly involve our worship and our gratitude too. Now, we may not initially think of our relationship with God or with Jesus as having vows. But when we confess and accept Jesus Christ as our Lord and Savior, we are making a statement that has some vows attached. When we ask Jesus to be the Lord of our life, we are asking him to be in charge, to be #1 in everything. In doing so we are pledging to place our will, our desires, our all second to his will, his desires… We are vowing to love the Lord above all else in our lives. When we make that vow we are committing to walk as Jesus’ disciple or follower. This vow entails doing what he did – loving God and neighbor with all that we are and with all that we have.

Part of the psalmist’s vow was to fulfill his vow to all of God’s people. All are children of God. Yes, perhaps some do not realize this, but they are still children of God. This is how Jesus fulfilled his vows to God. For the psalmist this would include the tribes and clans outside the nation of Israel. For Jesus that would mean loving the leper, the Samaritans, the blind and lame, the possessed, the sinners… Who might that be for you? Jesus said that we would be known by our love. What unexpected person will you extend love to today?

Prayer: Lord God, open my eyes to the person in need of love that I meet today. Help me to see as you see, to maybe see something or someone that I might normally miss. Break my heart to respond, O Lord. Amen.


Leave a comment

A Time of Praise

Reading: John 20: 24-31

Verse 27: “Put your finger here; see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it into my side. Stop doubting and believe”.

Thomas missed the first visit of Jesus to the disciples. Upon hearing the news that Jesus is alive, Thomas questions it. He makes the brash statement that he must reach out and touch the risen Lord to know its really true. A week later Thomas comes face to face with that possibility. Jesus comes again to the disciples. After again offering them his peace, Jesus says to Thomas, “Put your finger here; see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it into my side. Stop doubting and believe”. Reach out and touch me, Jesus says.

In that moment, instead of having a tactile moment, Thomas is blessed with a spiritual moment, with a heart moment. Knowing in his heart that Jesus is alive, Thomas confesses to Jesus: “My Lord and my God”. Thomas has this moment when he is assured in his heart that Jesus is the Messiah, is the resurrected Christ, is his Lord and Savior. Thomas did not need to physically touch Jesus after all. The same is true for you and for me. For us it may well be impossible to physically touch Jesus. And yet we believe. We are some of the ones Jesus refers to in verse 29 – the blessed “who have not seen and yet have believed”. Like Thomas we are not without evidence of the living Christ. Each of us have moments and experiences where we too can claim that we reached out and touched the risen Christ. Take a few moments and mentally stroll through these today, making those moments a time of praise between you and the living Christ.

Prayer: Lord God, as I think about my journey of faith it is scattered with times when you were so real and so present to me. Thank you for the many ways and times that you have been there when I needed you most and for the sacred moments when you just showed up. Please continue to visit me often Lord. Amen.


Leave a comment

The End?

Reading: John 11: 1-27

Verse 17: “On his arrival, Jesus found that Lazarus had already been in the tomb for four days”.

Each time I read this passage from John 11, I have the same initial reactions. Why didn’t Jesus heal Lazarus from afar? This is clearly within his options as Jesus has done this before for another who was ill (John 4). Adding depth to the question is the relationship that Jesus enjoyed with Mary, Martha, and Lazarus – they were good friends. If he were to heal anyone from afar, wouldn’t it be a good friend? Jesus does “heal” Lazarus after all. But that is for tomorrow’s part of the story.

Today’s passage largely centers around the idea of time. Here we see Jesus operating in one aspect of time while the disciples, Mary and Martha, and all those mourning operate in another aspect of time. Once in a while we step into Jesus’ time, but most often we live like the rest of the people in the passage. Mary and Martha send out the call for their good friend, Jesus, to come heal their brother Lazarus. They want Jesus to come now. They think Jesus needs to come now. The disciples probably think Jesus should leave now. Jesus stays two more days before beginning the journey to Bethany.

We often want things now too. We, as a general rule, do not like to wait. We all want COVID-19 to be over last week, right? We have all wanted the new job, the wedding or due date, the first day of college… to be here now. If we are ill or suffering, we want God to intervene now. We are also familiar with being on the other of the spectrum. If Lazarus were our brother, we would want death to come never. Yet it does come. In Martha’s words we hear words we have spoken or at least thought: “Lord, if you had been here…”

When Jesus arrives we learn that Lazarus has been dead for four days. The time for healing has surely passed. At least in Mary and Martha’s minds, in the disciples’ minds, in all the mourner’s minds, even in our minds – unless you know the end of the story. Jesus does. He knows the end of our story too. He reveals it in verses 25 and 26: “I am the resurrection and the life… whoever lives and believes in me will never die”. Jesus is not just talking of our earthly time. He is also speaking of unbounded time – of God’s time. Believing in Jesus brings true life to this side of time. But he is also saying that our last breath here is only the end of our earthly time and life. The moment of death is just the beginning of our eternal life with God. This is the resurrection that all who believe cling to. It shatters our limited understanding of time. Thanks be to God for this “ending” to our story.

Prayer: Father of all, thank you for your eternal claim on me and upon all who call your Son our Lord and Savior. It brings hope in today and on the hardest of days. Thank you, Lord. Amen.


Leave a comment

Blessed

Reading: Psalm 40: 1-11

Verse 4: “Blessed is the man who makes the Lord his trust”.

David begins the Psalm with words about how God has heard him and has rescued him. Consequently, David sings of the deliverance he has experienced, allowing others to see and put their trust in the Lord. Verse four opens with these words: “Blessed is the man who makes the Lord his trust”. When we trust in God, we too see his wonders and we begin to live into the plans he has for us – soon realizing that there are too many to tell about as well. God is so good to us.

At times we have to be patient, as David is at the start of the Psalm. In trust we come to acknowledge that God’s time is not our time and to understand that sometimes God’s plan is greater than anything we can even imagine. One comes to these understandings through experience and the maturing of our faith. In verse six David writes, “my ears have been pierced” or opened, depending on your translation. God has access to David’s mind because David chose to open it to God. We too do the same thing with the Holy Spirit – although we are not always receptive to the whispers and nudges. And in verse eight David voices a desire to have God’s ways written on his heart. He wants God’s presence in both his mind and in his heart. This is what we experience through the gift of the Holy Spirit. Again we have a choice. Like with David, with maturity of the faith comes a greater connection to God and, therefore, to the presence of the Holy Spirit.

Like David, may we speak of God’s faithfulness and salvation, of God’s love and truth. Doing so we too will reveal the mercy and righteousness of the Lord. Through faith God grants each of us a firm place to stand. May we too sing a new song of praise to our God!

Prayer: Lord God, may all I say and do proclaim your love for all of humanity. May my words and actions today help others to see and to begin to know you. Amen.


Leave a comment

Can You Remember When…

Reading: John 1: 29-42

Verse 39: “Come and see”.

Two of John the Baptist’s disciples leave and begin to follow Jesus as he passes by. They decide to check out Jesus based upon John’s declaration that Jesus is the “lamb of God”. What was it the led these two to follow Jesus? They do not know much about him. At present, though, they are only following him physically, not spiritually. Andrew and his companion are surely curious. They may even have sense something about Jesus that is special. Maybe John’s declaration was enough to make them want to tag along with Jesus.

Can you remember when you first heard about Jesus? Way back at the beginning of my faith journey, when I was just in early elementary school, I heard of Jesus. It feels like I’ve always known who Jesus was, but there had to be a day when I first heard the word “Jesus” and started to learn about him. If you were a little older when you first heard about Jesus, you might have a clearer memory of when it began for you. We read about Andrew and Peter’s day today in our passage.

Jesus quickly senses the tag-alongs and asks them, “What do you want”? It is not asked in the tone or with the intent that we said these words to our little sister or brother. It is asked as an invitation into conversation. In their response we can see that Andrew and friend do not really know what they want. They answer the question with a question: “Rabbi, where are you staying’? They are hinting at wanting to spend some time with Jesus. His response is loving and encouraging and welcoming: “Come and see”.

After spending the day with Jesus, Andrew is convinced enough to go and get his brother, Simon Peter. His declaration to Simon Peter mirrors the content of John’s declaration to Andrew. The words are different but both men know that the one who has been promised of old is now present among them.

Can you remember when you came to this truth in your heart? Maybe this is a day that is easier to remember. Maybe it is a moment that you can recall but do not know the exact time. At some point all who believe in Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior hear and respond to the invitation to “come and see”. From that day forward we are on a journey to come and see Jesus every day, over and over, growing daily in our relationship with him. Today, may we each reflect on our “come and see” moment and upon the journey since. May we rejoice and thank the Lord our God.

Prayer: Lord, it has been a long and wonderful journey these 40+ years. It’s been a journey with ups and downs, but even these have smoothed out as the journey continues. I thank you today for being with me in the good days just as much as in the bad. I praise you for being my Lord and my Savior. Amen.


Leave a comment

Ever Ready

Reading: Matthew 24: 36-44

Verse 44: “You must be ready because the Son of Man will come at an hour when you do not expect him”.

Advent is the season when we prepare to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. We read the familiar stories and build up the excitement for Christmas Eve. Along the way we are reminded of how the Christ brings peace, hope, joy, and love into our lives and into the world. It is a season of anticipation and excitement. Today’s passage is subtitled “The Day and Hour Unknown” in my Bible. Yet in our Advent world and on our little calendars the day is clearly marked – December 25!

Today’s passage flashes forward to the end of the story. We jump to the time when the risen Lord will return to rule the new heaven and earth. This day and hour are unknown. Jesus’ advice is to be ready. Noah is the example that Jesus points to. Noah is a good example for us yet today. The world tends to stay busy – weddings and celebrations, enjoying life. There is little time to give to faith. A little time each day and an hour or two a week? Seems a bit much, doesn’t it? Not for Noah. As the world went on around him he faithfully did God’s work. Even when the world ridiculed him for doing something that made no sense to them, Noah stayed the course.

It can be easy for us to get distracted. The holiday season feels especially busy. Guarding our time with God, growing in our faith, can be harder this time of year. Christmas is all about Jesus so it seems counterintuitive to say this but it is the reality. Yes, it is good to gather with family and friends, to celebrate the season. But our focus must remain on Jesus.

As we move through December and celebrate the Savior of the world, may we remain focused on our larger task – being prepared to meet Christ. Whether it is in the manger, face to face, or coming on the clouds, may we eagerly anticipate the coming of our Lord.

Prayer: Father God, in this season of Advent may I be ever ready to meet you. May I seek you in quiet study, in worship, in gathering with others, and in the face of the stranger. Amen.